The Signal

Serving the College since 1885

Monday October 3rd

International


The states allege that Navient, which services 25% of student loans in the U.S., worked with for-profit schools to issue loans to students who could not afford them(Image created by Lauren Schweighardt).

Student Loan Firm Navient Reaches Settlement to Cancel $1.7 Billion in Debt

Student loan provider Navient agreed in a settlement to wipe out $1.7 billion of debt and provide $95 million in restitution, following allegations from 39 states that it issued predatory and unfair loans to people who could not afford them. The agreement came on Jan. 13. Affected borrowers, totaling over 66,000, will have their loans cleared as a result of the settlement. 350,000 federal borrowers will also receive checks of $260 in restitution, according to the AP.

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Although approximately 97% of soldiers in the Army are vaccinated, the majority of the remaining 3% are mixed with soldiers attempting to be exempt from the vaccine due to religious or medical reasons(Flickr/“Virginia National Guard” by The National Guard, Dec. 31, 2020).

US Army, other branches discharge unvaccinated soldiers

Starting on Feb. 2, soldiers in the Army who are not vaccinated and who do not plan on getting vaccinated began to be discharged. Prior to the Army making this decision, the Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps had already gone through the process of discharging unvaccinated members. The Army is the last of these groups to have discharged members over their vaccination statuses, with Politico stating that the number of unvaccinated soldiers reaches over 3,300. 

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Ursula Mitra, a Manhattan birdwatcher told the New York Times, “I’ve been birding Central Park now for at least five years, and frankly I have never seen an eagle hunting on the reservoir except for the past four or five weeks." (Flickr/ "eagle" by Shanna Waller, June 19, 2011).

Bald Eagle “Rover” spotted hunting in Central Park

Bald eagles are a rare sight in cities, but that may be slowly changing. The New York Times reports that a bald eagle named Rover’s presence in New York City is part of a growing trend of birds of prey settling into urban areas. Rover himself was born to a family of bald eagles residing in another city, New Haven, Connecticut. 

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Stephen G. Breyer, one of the nine Supreme Court Justices, announced his retirement after his term of almost 27 years (Flickr/”Justice Stephen G Breyer” by Cknight70, April 25, 2013).

Justice Breyer announces retirement from Supreme Court

Stephen G. Breyer, one of the nine Supreme Court Justices, announced his retirement after his term of almost 27 years on Jan. 26,  According to Oyez, a website dedicated to archiving the Supreme Court, his career as a Supreme Court Justice began in 1994 when President Bill Clinton had appointed him for the second time after he lost the year prior to then Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.  

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According to the New York Times, Ukrainians have conducted individual trainings in which they learn how to shoot and reload a rifle, apply first-aid and identify dangerous bombs and mines(Flickr/ “Ukraine!” by Sara, March 17, 2006).

Ukraine prepares citizens for Russian invasion

Tensions between Russia and Ukraine have been building over the last few years, but recently the conflict has taken a turn towards war. Russia has gathered an army in preparation for a Ukraine invasion, a move that could change the political landscape of the world. If war comes to fruition, Ukraine’s existence and livelihood could be in peril. 

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The Supreme Court has decided to take another affirmative action case, but this time the Court looks a little different (Flickr/”Supreme Court Building” by Ben Schumin, February 1, 2006).

With new conservative majority, the Supreme Court accepts new case regarding Affirmative Action

Affirmative action has been a prevalent policy in the United States for the last 40 years. The withstanding practice attempts to limit discrimination in college admissions and job hiring by increasing efforts to include individuals in disadvantaged groups. In 2003, Grutter v. Bollinger permitted universities around the country to consider race as one of many factors in college admissions. A few attempts have been made since then to repeal affirmative action, including a case in 2016 with the University of Texas at Austin. Now, the Supreme Court has decided to take another affirmative action case, but this time the Court looks a little different. 

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Americans can now order four free at-home COVID-19 tests from the federal government, N95s to be available for free soon(Flickr).

Biden offers at-home Covid tests, N95 masks

Following President Joe Biden’s announcement last month that Americans would soon be able to order at-home Covid-19 tests for free from the federal government, the website covidtests.gov is now live and accepting orders for four free tests per household. Neither proof of citizenship nor a credit card is required to order the tests.

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World Health Organization honored Henrietta Lacks, an African American woman whose cells were unknowingly stolen from her for research purposes(Flickr).

WHO Honors Henrietta Lacks As Family Sues Biotech Company

On Oct. 13, the World Health Organization (WHO) honored Henrietta Lacks, an African American woman whose cells were unknowingly stolen from her for research purposes. Lacks’s cells were used without consent extensively in the research and treatment of numerous illnesses including HPV, polio, Parkinson’s, HIV/AIDS, numerous types of cancer and even COVID-19, making her incredibly important to medical advancements.  

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