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Sunday March 3rd

Donald Trump appeals gag order

<p><em>As former president Donald Trump faces an ongoing criminal trial to determine his liability for the insurrection of the Capitol building on Jan. 6, 2021, to overturn the election, the proceedings have recently taken a new turn (Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons/“</em><a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Trump_speaking_in_Manchester,_New_Hampshire.jpg" target=""><em>Trump speaking in Manchester, New Hampshire</em></a><em>” by Marc Nozell. CC-BY-2.0. February 8, 2016). </em></p>

As former president Donald Trump faces an ongoing criminal trial to determine his liability for the insurrection of the Capitol building on Jan. 6, 2021, to overturn the election, the proceedings have recently taken a new turn (Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons/“Trump speaking in Manchester, New Hampshire” by Marc Nozell. CC-BY-2.0. February 8, 2016). 

By Shaim Akhtar
Staff Writer

As former president Donald Trump faces an ongoing criminal trial to determine his liability for the insurrection of the Capitol building on Jan. 6, 2021, to overturn the election, the proceedings have recently taken a new turn. The presiding judge, Tanya Chutkan, filed a controversial gag order against Trump to prevent his opinions about court staff from being publicly disclosed, causing the motion to be appealed. 

Throughout his case, Trump has criticized the handling of the trial by making negative statements about the prosecutor and staff, stating on Truth Social, "How else would I explain that Jack Smith is DERANGED?" 

As a result of Trump's criticism of the prosecutor, Smith and his prosecuting team faced multiple security risks, leading Chutkan to issue a gag order to prevent any further statements from Trump against court officials.

Chutkan's gag order was challenged by Trump, who filed a motion to dismiss the order in an appeal to the Washington D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals. In the appeal, the defendant's attorneys argued that the order violated Trump's First Amendment rights to freedom of speech, contending that Trump could not freely address the public regarding his ongoing legal issues, as reported by NBC.

As the three-judge appellate court is reaching its final decision regarding Chutkan's gag order, prosecutors from Trump's civil case in New York have also urged the court to uphold the order. The prosecutors argue that Trump's criticism has created security risks for the court officials in the New York case, such as those in the ongoing criminal case, according to Newsweek.

If the court were to uphold the gag order, it could lead to multiple implications for Trump’s 2024 presidential election run. 

For example, during political debates during the Republican primaries and eventually the presidential debate, challengers could potentially argue about Trump's involvement in the criminal case to create a guilty persona to voters, which Trump would have to continually tailor his responses in order to not violate the gag order. According to Politico, one of the appellate judges in the trial, Patricia Millett, stated on the matter, “It would be really hard in a debate, when everyone else is going at you full bore. Your attorneys would have to have scripted little things you can say.” 

Trump tailoring his responses could prove detrimental to his campaign by preventing him from scrutinizing the Department of Justice and the criminal case, which could potentially tarnish his public image as guilty before a verdict has arisen, leading to a loss of support among the voting base, as reported by USA Today.

Yet, if the gag order is not upheld, this too could lead to potential consequences for court officials in his trial. For instance, the continuous escalation of security risks for court officials throughout the trial may increase the danger of physical harm towards the officials.

Whether the gag order is upheld or lifted by the appellate court, time will reveal the outcome in the coming weeks. Ultimately, the court's decisions could be detrimental to either side, influencing the 2024 elections and heightening the potential for attacks on the justice system, marking a significant chapter in the country’s history.




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