The Signal

Serving the College since 1885

Friday January 27th

Arts & Entertainment


(Photo courtesy of IMDB)

‘Drive My Car’ review: a deep character study with powerful themes of grief, regret and growth

With the recent release of Oscar nominations, I made it a personal goal to watch all the movies that were nominated. “Drive My Car,” directed by Ryusuke Hamaguchi, is among those films. Currently, the movie is only playing in a small number of theaters, so I took a trip to an arthouse theater in Princeton and was pleased with how this movie turned out. “Drive My Car” was released in the U.S. on Nov. 24, and is set to hit HBO Max on Mar. 2. 

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ACT having a fun time at their first meeting of the semester (Photo courtesy of Braden Drake/ ACT’s publicist).

The behind-the-scenes of what’s going on with theater groups on campus

When Covid struck and the world went into quarantine, show productions were critically affected. Unfortunately, shows couldn’t happen like normal and were either canceled altogether or moved to a virtual format. Now, shows are coming back strong in a somewhat normal — or traditional — manner. Of course, that doesn’t mean Covid isn’t completely disregarded. Masks-wearing is still required for both cast and audience members. However, shows can now return in-person with a full audience.

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(Photo courtesy of IMDb)

‘The Book of Boba Fett’ reveals only a few chapters of Boba’s story

With the release of the final episode of “The Mandalorian’s” second season, Disney+ and Lucasfilm treated “Star Wars” fans to a surprise announcement after the credits: a spin-off series centering around the longtime iconic character, Boba Fett, developed by “The Mandalorian” creator Jon Favreau, longtime “Star Wars” writer, director and producer Dave Filoni and “Alita: Battle Angel, Spy Kids,” and “From Dusk Till Dawn” director Robert Rodriguez. 

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(Photo courtesy of IMDB)

‘American Psycho’ reexamined: a brilliant work of satire

“American Psycho” (2000) is a drama/thriller film that chronicles the daily goings-on of 27-year-old Patrick Bateman (Christian Bale), a young Wall Street executive, and his slow descent into insanity. Alongside Bale, the film features a star-studded cast with Jared Leto, Willem Dafoe, Chloe Sevigny and Reese Witherspoon. Over the past two decades, “American Psycho” has carved itself into American pop culture, and the film is just as relevant today as it was at the time of its release. However, in recent years, I started to notice a disconnect forming between the original purpose of the film and those who are fans of it today.

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(Photo courtesy of Gabrielle Reese/  Publicist of Atlantic Records)

Wallows return with ‘Especially You’

Wallows, a Los Angeles-based trio made up of Dylan Minnette, Braeden Lemasters and Cole Preston, came back after two years with their new single, “Especially You.” The single heralds their upcoming album “Tell Me That it’s Over,” coming out March 25. The album, a collaboration with producer Ariel Rechtshaid (Vampire Weekend, Haim, Adele), offers a variety of musical genres, ranging from lo-fi post-punk to early ’90s pop psychedelia. “Especially You” presents an exciting evolution of Wallow’s sound that pairs the confessional tone of “Are You Bored” with the exciting production of “Ok.” 

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(Photo courtesy of IMDb)

‘The Power of the Dog’ review: an Oscar-worthy western that shifts the genre’s classic tropes

“The Power of the Dog,” which was released on Netflix on Nov. 17, had one of the most unique plots of anything I’ve seen last year. With Oscar season coming up and this film being one of the top contenders for best picture, I decided to give it a watch. The film stars Benedict Cumberbatch, Kirsten Dunst, Jesse Plemons and Kodi Smit-McPhee. It was also beautifully directed by Jane Campion. 

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(Photo courtesy of Netflix)

‘Murderville’ perfectly strikes the balance of comedy, mystery

Netflix’s new surprise hit show “Murderville” debuted this past week and proves that Netflix can indeed still make good shows. The series centers around Detective Terry Seattle (Will Arnett), who partners with a different celebrity guest each episode to help him solve a murder mystery. The big twist is that the celebrities aren’t given a script and have to improvise their way through the case before picking the culprit at the end of the episode.

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(Photo courtesy of Netflix)

A girl watches ‘The Woman in the House Across the Street from the Girl in the Window’: Season 1 review

“The Woman in the House Across the Street from the Girl in the Window,” a limited series on Netflix, centers around Anna (Kristen Bell), a bright-eyed, smiley-faced young woman with a generally chipper personality. It is dampened only slightly by the occasional hallucinations of her dead daughter, periods of hysteria, binge drinking and ombrophobia-induced panic attacks.

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(Photo courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures)

‘The Fallout’ expertly handles an emotional story with a heavy subject matter

The newest movie to release on HBO Max is director Megan Park’s highly anticipated feature directorial debut “The Fallout,” which she wrote herself. The film drew lots of acclaim and attention last year at the 2021 South by Southwest Film Festival where it won three awards. Now, almost a year after its debut in March of 2021, it has finally been released for the public to watch this heartbreaking story.

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Sidney Poitier won an Oscar for Best Actor for “Lilies of the Field” (Photo courtesy of IMDB).

Sidney Poitier and the power of perseverance

Sidney Poitier was a distinguished actor, director, diplomat and author. He was the first African American to win an Oscar for Best Actor (“Lilies of the Field”) and was an actor who redefined what the Black male lead could look like. Poitier’s characters, much like the man himself, were dignified, honorable and courageous. They were meaningful because they showed that the elevated male lead was not an archetype that only white men could play. Yet, as awe-inspiring as Poitier’s characters were, they pale in comparison to the integrity, determination and bravery of the man himself.  Poitier, 94, passed away in his home in Los Angeles on Jan. 6. However, his legacy lives on. 

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